(Un)Social? – by Clio Em

We’re discussing social media personas here on this blog. Each of us has one, like a sort of digital patronus. We control them and give them life, but they can take on a life of their own, too.

Clio Em, online, is me. This reflected self is creative, fun, and occasionally irreverent. She sings as well as I do but never hits any wrong notes, wears pretty dresses all the time and doesn’t lounge around the house composing at the piano in dance pants like I do. She is not a mobile photography enthusiast; she is a photographer.

There are many ways of being social, just as there are many ways of sharing one’s work. I very much like using Facebook daily, updating my friends and acquaintances on what it is that I’m up to, especially from the artistic angle. Same with twitter and Instagram. I use VSCO Grid to share my best photos, and showcase my audio creations on SoundCloud. I have separate accounts for various music projects I work on, and these are tremendously useful as documentation of my work, little windows into the world in which I create. I love sharing my photos, not only because I enjoy taking them but also because I feel that if I can spread a little more beauty in the world, then it’s a post that was well worth it.

Yet artists sometimes make the mistake of directly equating followers to fans and likes to true emotional connection. Of course this can be the case. But online, a like or follow can also indicate friendship, professional reciprocity, or it can be an efficient form of bookmarking. It’s helpful to understand who’s reading your posts, but also to realize that offline interaction is important, too.

The real value of social media, for me at least, is its use as a communications catalyst. Without Facebook or twitter, I could never have looked up and written to many musicians I very much admire and forged meaningful collaborations, which led to such opportunities as study, research, performances, and compositions. In all these cases, social media was the medium for communication. I used it as an initial contact point, and then jumped off from there to meaningful discussion, meeting in real life, and making music and art together. But there comes a point in my day when it becomes crucial to actually get offline and create, purely in the analogue world. To play an instrument or to sing, without distractions.

We digital natives no longer have the luxury, or the curse, of existing alone most of the time, and so when we do get this rare time alone offline, we tend to either value or reject it. At one point or another throughout our day, even during quiet moments, we are often in heavy and constant contact with others through our smartphones and computers. Others’ thoughts and feelings influence ours, and vice versa. For me as an artist, this means that I can work more easily with others. Sometimes it helps me get inspired. I can find performers to play my compositions at a moment’s notice, and I can seek out an ensemble to sing with just as easily. I can apply to festivals, grants, and other opportunities online. I can communicate with the people behind these opportunities faster and more easily. Yet it also means that at times, it is difficult to take the time to unplug and think things out without that online influence.

In certain situations, social media belongs in a concert setting, for example in digital and net art, or during live electronics performances and so on. But in the vast majority of cases, it’s probably a good idea to separate our online personas from our offline selves.
Photography by Georg Aufreiter

Clio Em is an award-winning musician, writer, and creative on a mission to discover new sound worlds. Drawing from her extensive classical piano, composition and voice training at institutions such as McGill University and the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Clio’s distinct crossover style fuses elements of pop, folk, classical, and electronic genres that blend together into an arresting whole. Her work with text complements her music. Clio Em’s instruments of choice include piano, various guitars and ukuleles, her own voice, electronics, found objects, and the occasional touch of cello, accordion, and small percussion instruments. Born and raised in Alberta, Clio Em now calls many places in the galaxy home, Canada and Europe among them. She writes at clio-em.com.

Protecting Anonymity in a Social Media Age – by Jean Sa’Mick

When I was younger I pictured this over romanticized version of being a writer. In my head I would live a quiet type of fame, where people knew who I was from my iconic writing (I had fashioned myself as a more upbeat Sylvia Plath; Deep, soul searching concepts without the downer of actually hating my life) but largely left me alone to enjoy my life privately. People knew who Stephen King was, but the paparazzi weren’t camped outside his Hollywood mansion. Writers got to be known without being famous, and that appealed to me.

As I grew older, I realized that fame wasn’t what I sought so much as respect and recognition for work. The star studded lifestyle of J. K. Rowling and its corresponding troubles appealed to me none whatsoever. I felt, and still feel, that as a writer it is your job to present the facts of what you’re talking about as opposed to opinion or reflection of persona. “You” shouldn’t really weigh in unless you’re specifically writing a biased article, and your persona shouldn’t be a factor when people are reading your work.

So, this is where I have troubles with Social Media. In 2015 one of the best ways to build a professional reputation for yourself is to broadcast your work over social media channels, drawing the attention of people who may be interested in paying you money. In a world now devoid of stuffy conference ‘networking’ sessions we must maximize every chance to make an impression, even before a physical opportunity presents itself.

The downside to having those platforms for promotion is that you sacrifice the ability to tailor what an audience views, and with it a portion of your privacy. I’m not picky with the content I write about, and frequently welcome a challenge. That open mindedness has landed me some cool jobs, from a staff writer of a sex blog to covering music conferences day to day, from writing copy for renovation companies to touring with musicians. 70% of the content I write is safe for audiences of all ages, and the remainder sure isn’t.

Does NSFW content scandalize me? Hah, No. I’ve written about things that were so shocking my own hair got curlier (dammit). But is it a big deal to other people? Yes. The best way to avoid pigeon holing yourself is to follow a few simple steps. Feel free to adapt and decline as you please.

  1. Limit your online personal life. If you have multiple social media accounts, pick which ones to use professionally and which to use personally. Yes, the lines can blur sometimes with certain people and organizations, but this provides the best blueprints for keeping work-life and personal life separate. If you find Twitter reaches more potential professional contacts, maximize your reach that way and keep friend fights and break up quotes to Facebook. (Then, go back and delete the friend fights and break up quotes because you aren’t 17 anymore). By keeping both sides of your life separate, you minimize the chances of looking unprofessional in any manner when those pictures of you doing the keg stand in a tutu finally surface.
  2. Try to remain as neutral as possible. Unless your job is specifically one sided (think party specific political reporting) don’t share your opinion. You may be limiting yourself professionally when the other side looks to hire someone with your qualifications. It’s also a great way to avoid getting in pointless arguments with people over the internet. I know we all love a good back and forth over an online forum; riding in on our high horses, ready to tell the opposing side it has a stupid face and their mothers dress them funny. But resist the urge to feed the trolls by avoiding the situation altogether. You never know where your next contract might come from, and it could be a lot of money from someone you’ve just told off.
  3. Do your research. Nothing lowers your credibility than being wrong about something publicly. Find out the corresponding hashtags, look into legitimate sources for background info and if you don’t know something, look into it. This applies for everything, whether it be writing an article on a protest or giving instruction on stripping down furniture. Don’t act like you know something if you don’t actually because it is guaranteed to be pointed out by someone who does. On the flip side, people may look to you for information. By being accurate, you’re working your online presence like retail: giving the customers a reason to return.
  4. Consider a pseudonym. Don’t try and deny it, you’ve always wanted to use that Ida Fukder alias. Chet Manly. Ben D. R. Rodriquez. Hell, you could be Princess Consuela Banana-Hammock if your heart desires. By being someone else, you can write about whatever you want without having to worry about it being immediately associated with you. I’m not recommending you act ashamed of your work, because it can be shown to like-minded parties for professional purpose just the same as your regular stuff. Writing for a sex blog has landed me work with other delightfully pervacious individuals, but it’s not widely accessible content. The open minded hipster couple who hire you to rewrite their website content don’t care, but for the privately religious clothing designer it could be the deciding factor between you and another candidate.

A good rule of thumb is to consider your parent or grandparents reaction to lascivious content. My mother is as unshakable as a cement column driven into the ground by Thor himself, so I don’t worry too much about her reacting negatively. Other people’s families are not as easy going, and if what you put on social media could embarrass you in their eyes, you may want to consider going the alias route.

Consider the above guidelines the next time you put something on social media, work related or otherwise. Is it going to embarrass you later? Limit or increase your options with work? Are you typing with a cool head and a full stomach? These things matter when making decisions about personal web content.

Jean is an Ottawa based freelancer and Toronto native, the latter of which she keeps under wraps during the hockey season. Her work has been featured on cultural blogs like Apt613, Ottawa Showbox and Herd Magazine, in addition to providing content for local small businesses like Jet Black Salon and UpRise Fit. When she isn’t writing, she occasionally moonlights as a masked superhero. Follow her as she fights crime and writes stories; Twitter as @reddhairing or on her website writingbyjean.ca.