(Un)Social? – by Clio Em

We’re discussing social media personas here on this blog. Each of us has one, like a sort of digital patronus. We control them and give them life, but they can take on a life of their own, too.

Clio Em, online, is me. This reflected self is creative, fun, and occasionally irreverent. She sings as well as I do but never hits any wrong notes, wears pretty dresses all the time and doesn’t lounge around the house composing at the piano in dance pants like I do. She is not a mobile photography enthusiast; she is a photographer.

There are many ways of being social, just as there are many ways of sharing one’s work. I very much like using Facebook daily, updating my friends and acquaintances on what it is that I’m up to, especially from the artistic angle. Same with twitter and Instagram. I use VSCO Grid to share my best photos, and showcase my audio creations on SoundCloud. I have separate accounts for various music projects I work on, and these are tremendously useful as documentation of my work, little windows into the world in which I create. I love sharing my photos, not only because I enjoy taking them but also because I feel that if I can spread a little more beauty in the world, then it’s a post that was well worth it.

Yet artists sometimes make the mistake of directly equating followers to fans and likes to true emotional connection. Of course this can be the case. But online, a like or follow can also indicate friendship, professional reciprocity, or it can be an efficient form of bookmarking. It’s helpful to understand who’s reading your posts, but also to realize that offline interaction is important, too.

The real value of social media, for me at least, is its use as a communications catalyst. Without Facebook or twitter, I could never have looked up and written to many musicians I very much admire and forged meaningful collaborations, which led to such opportunities as study, research, performances, and compositions. In all these cases, social media was the medium for communication. I used it as an initial contact point, and then jumped off from there to meaningful discussion, meeting in real life, and making music and art together. But there comes a point in my day when it becomes crucial to actually get offline and create, purely in the analogue world. To play an instrument or to sing, without distractions.

We digital natives no longer have the luxury, or the curse, of existing alone most of the time, and so when we do get this rare time alone offline, we tend to either value or reject it. At one point or another throughout our day, even during quiet moments, we are often in heavy and constant contact with others through our smartphones and computers. Others’ thoughts and feelings influence ours, and vice versa. For me as an artist, this means that I can work more easily with others. Sometimes it helps me get inspired. I can find performers to play my compositions at a moment’s notice, and I can seek out an ensemble to sing with just as easily. I can apply to festivals, grants, and other opportunities online. I can communicate with the people behind these opportunities faster and more easily. Yet it also means that at times, it is difficult to take the time to unplug and think things out without that online influence.

In certain situations, social media belongs in a concert setting, for example in digital and net art, or during live electronics performances and so on. But in the vast majority of cases, it’s probably a good idea to separate our online personas from our offline selves.
Photography by Georg Aufreiter

Clio Em is an award-winning musician, writer, and creative on a mission to discover new sound worlds. Drawing from her extensive classical piano, composition and voice training at institutions such as McGill University and the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Clio’s distinct crossover style fuses elements of pop, folk, classical, and electronic genres that blend together into an arresting whole. Her work with text complements her music. Clio Em’s instruments of choice include piano, various guitars and ukuleles, her own voice, electronics, found objects, and the occasional touch of cello, accordion, and small percussion instruments. Born and raised in Alberta, Clio Em now calls many places in the galaxy home, Canada and Europe among them. She writes at clio-em.com.

When Personal is Professional – by Catherine Brunelle

Way(yyyyy) back in the early days of high school, I was 25% keener, 25% nerd, and 50% wall flower. But you know what else I was? A hundred percent hoping to be noticed. Between my highs and lows, all I really wanted was to be seen. So here’s what went through my brain most days: “Put up your hand! Say what you’re thinking!” Quickly followed by: “But what if you offend someone? What if other people know better? Be safe, say nothing!” A gag of nerves stifled my voice.

Then and Now

All this was before social media entered my life. It was also before I did a lot of other things like realize everyone is insecure and to some degree we’re all afraid of screwing up. However, for the sake of this post’s theme around online personas, let’s just stick with the whole ‘social media changed my life’ thesis, because it did. It really did. And I’ll prove it to you with three quick stories: Voice, Social and Career.

 Voice

“I didn’t realize you’re funny,” said my friend after reading my blog. This was itself hilarious since I’d known her literally my entire life and my blog was about having breast cancer. But I took it as a sign of a good thing.

At first Bumpyboobs was a secret from everyone, even my parents who I hadn’t then told about my suspected disease. Because it was secret, the blog was easy to name. If it had been created for the eyes of others, I probably would have called it ‘my super noble journey in conquering breast cancer’ or something like that. But this was for my eyes only, so I named it exactly what made me laugh most. The name was my unfiltered voice, aka, the endearing smart ass. That way of starting things, of doing it for myself and not others, has stayed with me over the years of writing.

Number one personal rule for blogging: If it’s my blog, it’s my story. As someone writing about breast cancer, after the blog went public I was quickly labelled a cancer blogger – people would email me asking to review their health products or just expect me to write about cancer all the time. But it’s my blog and I associate it with my identity both offline and online. Adhering to an imposed label, even one that gets attention, was just another form of self-censoring and I didn’t need that. I’m a whole lot of things and that is reflected in the posts. Those readers who dig it, dig me. It’s that simple.

My website has since changed to CatherineBrunelle.com to shake off expectations. But I have to say, it was always a secret thrill at executive networking events to direct politicians, CEOs and government officials to my website: “Bumpyboobs.com.”

Social

Once upon a time, someone I know complained about a person on their Facebook. He didn’t understand why they kept posting so many updates about their day. Who cared? Not him, that’s for sure.

These words stuck with me for a while and I had to chew them over. Why bother saying anything online? Who was I to share a stupid reflection, or picture, or anything? But then I realized, these thoughts felt like high school all over again. I don’t want to put that gag back on. And so I thought about it, and came to realize something important: different platforms, different expressions.

It’s absolutely okay to tweet a stream of observations while riding the bus in Ottawa. But if I did that on Facebook non-stop, it would flood timelines. It’s important to know your platform, regardless of whether you’re talking personal or professional. A while back I did a photo shoot of two dolls in love, which were definitely best shared on Tumblr. Any and all food pics go on Instagram. Business and life articles on Linkedin. Articles and vacation pictures go on Facebook. But best of all is Twitter, because it’s my catchall.

Be respectful, have fun, and know your platforms. If social media is a voice box for things you find interesting, weird creative experiments, and brave introductions to awesome people – then I say just go for it. Who cares about “Who cares?”

 Career

Here’s the thing. I say all this about voice and expression, but I also realize that the first thing many employers or clients do before working with you is check your social media. What we do socially reflects upon us professionally. This is a GOOD thing.

I wanted to write, so I started a blog. Suddenly I was a writer. I wanted to talk about writing, so I co-founded a podcast, suddenly I was a presenter. I wanted to become an author so I crowd funded online, and suddenly I had a novel. I was sick of being a cancer blogger, so I redesigned my website to cast off the pink ribbon vibe and suddenly I felt better. When it comes to the internet, you create the impression. There are no grades or degrees to be won – we gain our cred by taking action, and there’s no limitation on the actions we can take.

This might sound naïve, but it actually does work. I landed my first writing gig by attending a networking event and simply telling everyone there that I was a writer. All I had was my blogging and guest posts to back up that claim, but it was enough to secure steady work. It was an incredible feeling, and no one at any point said, ‘you can’t do that’; instead they said, ‘can you do that for me?’ Since then, I’ve literally created opportunities and expertise through experiments online. Today I get to work an incredible marketing job in a position that resonates deeply with my interests and values. It’s awesome.

(And even if I’m making it up as I go, at least I’m going!)

So there you have it. Three very quick stories about creating an online persona helped me find my voice. Thanks to Red Brick Rooster for this opportunity to share a piece of my story!


Catherine Brunelle is a content creator, marketer and author of the perfect book club novel, Claire Never Ending. Visit her website at CatherineBrunelle.com and do be sure to say hello over on Twitter.

Social Media Personas: Who am I?

One of the best things about my job is that I get to meet such a wide variety of people both on and off line. So naturally I want to share some of the insight I have gained from these individuals with you guys!

I’m so generous.

Over the next few weeks I will be sharing some guest pieces written for THIS HERE BLOG about online personas. I have picked writers who rely heavily on social media for either their profession or their professional hobby and have unique challenges in terms of how to represent themselves online.

We all navigate the tricky waters of personal vs shareable. Let’s see what advice these folks can give us. Then at the end of the series I will be posting my nuttiest blog yet summarizing my thoughts on how to figure out what you should share and what you should spare.

Happy reading ready readers.

 

 

 

Why Women Need to be a Part of Your Business Plan

At the risk of whacking you over the head with yet another preachy article about why women are awesome (side note: women are awesome), I want to spend a quick minute putting my two cents in the ceramic pig.

womeninbusiness

Diversity is not just about visually representing everyone equally. That is a crucial aspect of course, but I want to talk about the importance of diversification in emotional thinking.

Women are trained to be vulnerable. Not all women are and certainly a lot of men are as well but hear me out. Women are often very good at communicating the greyer, messier, much harder to track and measure aspects of life. Maybe it is because society has bashed it into us that its okay for women to be vulnerable, talk about feelings, and have every step of their journey publicly scrutinized. So let’s think about a recent work situation where it would have been useful to bring some of these elements to the table.

An example I see a lot is a company making a blunder. Some companies will immediately jump to re-positioning or rationalizing their way out of failure. But this is a real opportunity to demonstrate reflective thinking to those who feel betrayed by your brand. Start by saying “we made this mistake” “we grew too much, too fast” “we missed a key step when developing this product” and change the conversation to a chance for learning. Give your customers the opportunity to rationalize for themselves. This will generate a much more authentic sympathy. A great example is one in our very own Ottawa. I won’t disclose any details but I think this example will still serve well.

Last year a local business was on the path to launch early 2015. The launch date was set, the press was buzzing, and the people were ready to engage in the business. Then a crisis struck. Red tape and permit restrictions put the business in a position of not only having to delay its launch date, but suspend it indefinitely. Then they did something very clever – they started the conversation about failure. They went to the media and talked openly about the difficulty in the current process for getting these permits and how it’s been a huge learning experience for them. These articles were full of feelings! Frustration, anger, confusion, disappointment, hope, passion, etc… – but it was coming from the company. Once the ball got rolling again they posted updates every step of the way and instead of seeing a drop off in interest, the opposite happened. People were now invested in the success of this business. They wanted a win for passionate people looking to break through the red tape and do something interesting. They demonstrated immense emotional resilience as a company.

So why women? No, it’s not because they are very good at saying sorry and still making you feel at fault. It is because they are good at feelings. Being vulnerable is something we are faced with whether we want it or not. Every time we post a selfie we are judged, every time we assert ourselves we are scrutinized harshly . So a good number of us have developed some level of comfort with being vulnerable even if it is just out of survival. So a lot of women have naturally learned to be emotionally resilient in the workplace. Of course, this can be achieved without women but with diversification of employees comes a diverse set of emotional traumas, failures, and successes. Women just happen to be at the front lines of scrutiny so trust us when we tell you that it is better to be the first one to tell the story, even if its difficult to tell, than to let others tell it for you.

Vulnerability can be a real strength in business and I am by no means the first person to see this. There are tons of amazing people out there talking about just this. So below I have shared one of my favourite teachings around this marvelous subject:

Feelings are awesome. Thanks for reading!

Toni

 

 

Talking to Others

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I recently did another Brown Bag Lunch at HUB Impact Ottawa. This one was around crowdfunding videos but what it was really about was storytelling with your values. What I love most about the opportunity to speak at the BBL is that it also gives me a chance to work through some of my own ideas.  It’s like throwing spaghetti on the ceiling to see if it’s cooked properly. So here are some things that stuck and stayed:

I’m Sorry for Asking

Think about how often in the day you use apologetic language. “I’m sorry for bugging you but…” “Sorry to ask but…” “You don’t have to but I’d really appreciate it if you…”. Why do we do this? Guilt, the fear of rejection, the fear of overstepping or asking too much? While her reputation is a mixed bag of insult and awe, Amanda Palmer did break the record for the largest amount of money crowdfunded for a music project. The TEDTalk that followed her success tells us just how she did it – by learning the ‘Art of Asking’. Listen carefully to how she describes asking as a gift to be given. What she is really telling you – is have strong values which you can share with others in a meaningful way.

 

How Do We Make Friends?

There are a number of ways we make friends of varying degrees, but some of the more common ways we connect for the first time are as follows:

– Asking someone a favour

– Telling someone a secret or something that makes you vulnerable

– Sharing an interest or activity

– Being part of something larger (HUB network, Christian Youth Group, Burlesque Dance Troupe)

All of these have one thing in common – they rely on an exchange. I give you something and in return I trust you with it. It is for you. In crowdfunding it is essential to remember that people are not just buying into your product or idea but they are buying into you. They want to cheer for you and your success. So before you do anything you have to have a very clear vision of what your success looks like and what all the steps leading up to look like so that you can communicate this to your backers.

The way that people buy into your vision is through the expression of your values. For example:

My vision is a space where people can come together and grow vegetables. My values are education through mentoring, sustainable living, and getting vitamin D everyday.

So when I begin to shape my story for the video I think about how to represent those values in order to tell the story of a community garden. Perhaps I will choose a moment of a mother showing her son how to plant something. While it shows the daily application of this project, it also demonstrates that my project values meaningful human connection.

Video

There are countless statistics proving that crowdfunding campaigns with video make at least 1.5x more money than those without. This is for a number of reasons but in storytelling when we need to deliver a decisive and meaningful message we use symbols. A flower wilting tells us about the futility of life. So when you are planning your next campaign video whether for crowdfunding or just plain crowd pleasing think about your core values and ultimate vision. Think about meaningful symbols or visual moments which demonstrate your values. But mostly – don’t be afraid to ask for help. People like feeling valuable and if you reward them with the experience and story they are buying into, you are not overstepping one bit.

Keep creating…

Toni